teaching

Harry Potter Robes and Other Magical Fun

Posted by on Jul 8, 2011 in Sewing, teaching | 4 comments

I’ve had this Harry Potter inspired project on the back-burner for the last few months, but with the new (and last!) movie coming out very soon I knew now was the time to tackle it.

And so, may I present, straight from my sewing room Madam Malkin’s: Robes for All Occasions: Gryffindor school robes!

I used this tutorial on BurdaSyle and although I found them a bit of a challenge to put them together, I am pretty happy with the results.

I used broadcloth for its affordability, and found the Gryffindor crest on Etsy.

If you are thinking of making some yourself, definitely read through all of the comments on the tutorial, as they were really helpful in drafting and cutting out the pattern.  Next time (oh yes, there will be a next time, I still have at least one more to make!) despite the extra fabric it will take, I think I will line the whole front, and not just 4 inches as the pattern calls for.  This was the first time I have used seam tape and I wasn’t really happy with it. 

I can’t wait to hand these robes over to their owner tomorrow! 

Harry Potter Fun!

Your robes are on and you are ready for a magical adventure.  Here are some magical ideas I’ve collected from around the web.  (Most of these I used to create a magical day at Hogwarts for my students, but the kitchen creations would be appreciated by fans of all ages.)

1.  Find or make yourself an owl and send letters by “owl post” in invisible ink.  (I was lucky enough to find a beautiful snowy owl stuffy at a yard sale, but several years ago I made a pompom owl for my mother as part of  Harry Potter-themed birthday present, that, of course, had to arrive by owl post.)  Or write letters in regular ink, or with calligraphy pens,  on “scrolls” (receipt or adding-machine tape works great for this!)

2.  Spend a day taking classes at Hogwarts! 

  • Herbology: create magical plants of your own with art supplies, or use your imagination and spend some time in the garden planting and caring for “magical” plants. 
  • Potions: think cooking or science experiments (magic mud is a favourite), or write your own
  • Transfiguration: play a game of charades
  • Charms: create your own spells
  • and if you have enough people, don’t forget to play a game of Quidditch (I have played a modified version with as few as seven people)

3.  Cook up some favourite Hogwarts treats by following some fun recipes on Heather Bailey’s site: Chocolate Wands, Butterbeer and mini broomsticks, Cockroach Clusters, and of course you could always make chocolate frogs or pretend any jelly beans are of the “Bertie Botts Every Flavoured” variety.   

Enjoy!   And remember: “Draco Dormiens Nunquam Titillandus”

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Making Butter – Fun for Kids (and Grown-Ups Too!)

Posted by on Apr 20, 2011 in Cooking/Recipes, teaching | 4 comments

You might remember from last year that once a year my students get to choose their own topic of study for a month.  This year the winner was something they called “Ooshy, Gooshy, Take Home Science.”   So this month I have been up to my elbows in goo each day as we explore the messiest science experiments I can find, and at the end of the day there is always something ooshy or gooshy for them to take home with them. 

On one of our theme days I decided to teach the students about kitchen chemistry.  We had already learned about suspensions in a previous science experiment (a solution where solid molecules are suspended in a liquid) so making our own butter seemed like a good extension of this.

It was a hit!   (With the students and the grown-ups in the room.)  It was fun to make, and delicious spread on our home-made pizza dough  (we studied how leavening agents work) with a little garlic and cheese as homemade garlic fingers. 

You can make your own butter, too.  Here’s how:

Start with whipping cream and a clean glass jar with a tight-fitting lid.  (The bigger the jar, the harder work this is going to be so start small.)

Fill the jar 1/3 full of cream.

Now shake!

This takes a lot of shaking, and if there are kids doing it, a lot of “is it done yet?  Can we look at it?  If you stop to look, you will see that it is getting thicker, but it’s not butter yet.

Put some good shaking music on to renew the motivation to keep shaking!  In my classroom we enjoyed shaking around to “Philadelphia Chickens” from the Sandra Boynton CD of the same title.

Eventually it is going to get so thick that you feel like you can’t shake anymore.  Trust me, it can be done. 

On the outside the jar is all white.  On the inside you will find you’ve made whipping cream.  Yummy, but not the goal for the day.  Put the lid back on and shake some more. 

You will know your shaking is paying off when you start to see little bits of clear glass again.  Keep shaking.

As the cream turns into butter and buttermilk the sides of the jar will become clear again and you will be able to see the butter starting to gather.  Keep shaking until you have a nice clump of butter and some milky white liquid (the buttermilk)

Open the jar and pour off the buttermilk (you can save it for baking if you like.)  Rinse your butter with cold water and transfer to a serving dish.

You have just made your very own butter!  (and enjoyed a good arm workout, too!)  Enjoy!

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A Little Halloween Fun

Posted by on Oct 28, 2010 in life, teaching | 2 comments

With Halloween only a few days away, tomorrow will be our Halloween celebration at school. 

I have a few fun surprises for my students tomorrow, including some pumpkin and spider inspired math games and a monster design lab in the afternoon.

And they are so excited about wearing their costumes to school!  So excited, that they convinced someone else to dress up.

And no…it wasn’t me (I didn’t need convincing.)

Meet Harold.  A childhood friend of hubby’s who made an appearance in my classroom as Dr. Shrinkle, the amazing mathematician who made patterns shrink with his magic shrinking suitcase.  It was love at first sight and my students have been showering him with so much love and affection that he thinks he is a superstar.  

And yesterday they convinced him to dress up as a pumpkin. 

He’s pretty cute, don’t you think?

I will be attending the festivities as the dormouse from Alice in Wonderland (all of the teachers at my school are going as characters from this book, with minimal costume pieces the students will have to guess what story we are all from).

The resident cat is modelling my ears and tail. 

This is one time of year when I am extra grateful for my sewing machine (and glue gun!)

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Making Ice Cream

Posted by on Jun 6, 2010 in Cooking/Recipes, teaching | 6 comments

Every year the students in my class have one month where the get to choose, as a class, what they would like to learn about.  I am always amazed by the wide range of topics they come up with (my Grade 1/2′s had World War 2, Crystals and Gems, God, and Circus Performing among some of the final contenders….) and I always enjoy the process of learning something new together.

After much debate my current students finally decided that they wanted to learn about the ice age so we have spent most of May and the beginning of June learning about saber-tooth tigers, wooly mammoths, glaciers, cave paintings and primitive hunting techniques.  My students have begged to watch the movie “Ice Age” as a way to celebrate all that we have learned but as our school has a no movie policy I had to come up with something that seemed equally as celebratory.

So I decided we should make our own ice cream

I have never made my own ice cream before.

Google came to my rescue again and I found directions for making ice cream using two baggies and some ice.  It seemed simple but I have learned from hard experience that I need to try everything myself before attempting it with my students.   So it was that I was making ice cream in my kitchen early Sunday morning.  And then I got to eat ice cream on an early Sunday morning (teaching does have its job perks!) 

This is super easy to do, and really fun! 

To begin, put 1/2 cup milk (I used full fat milk), 1/4 tsp. vanilla and 1 Tbsp sugar into a ziplock sandwich bag and seal tightly.

Then fill a large ziplock bag about half-full of ice and add 6 Tbsp of salt (I used coarse pickling salt – a lot of internet sites said to use rock salt but I couldn’t find any and the coarse salt worked great!)  Nest your little bag of milk into the ice and salt mixture and seal the big bag.

Now set your timer for 5 minutes and massage your bag, moving the ice over and around your bag of milk.  I found it easiest to wrap the bag in a tea towel so that my hands didn’t get so cold and then I just massaged away!  After five minutes are up, open your bag.  The little bag of milk should be cold and solid.  (If it’s not – a bit more massaging in the ice should do the trick).

Use your towel to wipe off the outside of the little bag (you don’t want to get salt into your ice cream) and then spoon the contents into a little dish and enjoy!

It’s not quite what you would get from an ice cream parlour but it’s cold and delicious and you made it yourself – what could be better than that?

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Surrounded by Books

Posted by on May 10, 2010 in Books, teaching | 4 comments

It has been a whirlwind of a week-end here.  I spent all day Friday and Saturday at a teaching conference – sitting and listening (oh, it is so hard for me to sit all day!)  Then it was the annual library book sale on Friday night (an event NOT to be missed!) a birthday party for a special young lady on Saturday night (and scrapbooking after – yeah!) and a lovely day spent with my mother-in-law on Sunday.  After fighting with insomnia last night (despite being exhausted – how does THAT happen?) I am ready to head to bed and curl up with a good book.

And right now I have a large selection of books from which to choose.  I am somewhat of an eclectic reader as I enjoy reading many different kinds of books, and am probably one of the few people who actually considers cookbooks to be reading material and not just references (I read mine cover to cover.)  Currently I have this eclectic mix on my nightstand:

I still remember reading “The Shadow on Hawthorn Bay” by Janet Lunn when I was 11 so I couldn’t resist buying another of her books when I saw it at the library sale.  (and when books are only 50 cents and they support one of your favourite places on earth, what did you have to lose?)

Here are my other library sale finds:  I am especially excited about reading “don’t name the ducks” especially since I am the kind of person who probably WOULD name the ducks…. 

And then I found some books for my classroom.

Island of the Blue Dolphins and The Hundred Dresses are must-have classics.   I loved Natalie Babbitt’s “Tuck Everlasting” and so far am also enjoying “The Search for Delicious” (I read half of it last night when I couldn’t sleep.  Children’s literature makes for good night-time reading…)

Not bad for an hour spent at a book sale, and this would probably be enough to keep me going for a while, but it seems this was meant to be a book week-end for me because I LOVED the presenters I saw at Saturday’s conference so much that I felt compelled to buy both of their books!

It really was worth sitting all day.  I am so excited about reading these and applying everything I learned!

  But they will have to wait awhile because I found these in the mail today.

Don’t you just love getting parcels in the mail?  I do!  Especially when they contain…..

more books!  This has to be one of the best perks of having my teaching certification.   I get full use of the big education library in Toronto, I can choose any books I want and they mail them to me for free AND pay the return postage.  Oh the books I can read!!    But as they do have to be returned these titles are now the top ”to read” books on my list. 

I live in a house surrounded by books.

They are on the shelves, they are on the floor, they cover the tables (and couches and chairs) and are in bags by the door!

They entice me with their covers, just waiting to be read, so I’m off to put my feet up, and read them all in bed!

What are YOU reading right now?

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Earth Day Books

Posted by on Apr 21, 2010 in Books, teaching | 1 comment

I am a guest poster on Playing by the Book today as part of their “Fantastic Fiction for Kids” series.   In honour of Earth Day (tomorrow) I share a selection of my favourite environmental education stories.  Check out my post, and then be sure to check out some of Zoe’s other posts for reviews of some great children’s books and  creative and inspiring activities for kids.

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